• George Lucas, Berlin 2005

    George Lucas, Berlin 2005.
  • Hoischen / Mark – „untitled“, 136,0 x 100,5 cm, Glossy C‑Print on wood 2020

    Chris­ti­an Hoischen 

    Hoischen / Mark – „untitled“, 136,0 x 100,5 cm, Glossy C-Print on wood 2020.
  • Uckermark, Frühlingsanfang 2024

    Uckermark, 2024
  • Nikolaus List, Berlin 2024

    Nikolaus List, Berlin 2024.
  • Allistair Walter, Berlin 2024

    Allistair Walter, Berlin 2024.
  • Barbara Wolff and Katharina Stöver (Peles Duo), Berlin 2024

    Barbara Wolff and Katharina Stöver, Peles Duo, Berlin 2024
  • Daniel Marzona and Egidio Marzona, Berlin 2017

    Daniel Marzona and Egidio Marzona.
  • Michael Laurent, Berlin 2024

    The artist Michael Laurent in Oliver Marks Studio in the Sky.
  • Frank Nitsche, Berlin 2024

    Frank Nitsche ind his Berlin Studio.
  • Thalia, London 1983

    Thalia, London 1983.
  • Westhafen 1987

    Oliver Mark Westhafen 1987, Vintage Silver Gelatine Print 45,6 x 60,7 cm.

    glossy gelat­in sil­ver print 45,6 / 60,7 cm, prin­ted 1988

  • Cameron Carpenter, Berlin 2012

    Oliver Mark Cameron Carpenter, Berlin 2012.
  • Stivali visti da dietro, 2024

    Homage to Domen­ico Gnoli
    C‑Print
    Size: 85,7 × 120 cm
    Edi­tion 1/2 +1 E.A

    Isa´s boots 2024.
  • Roberto Cavalli, Florence 2008

    Born Novem­ber 15. 1940
    Died April 12. 2024 (aged 83)

    Roberto Cavalli, Florence 2008
  • Aline Schwibbe, Berlin 2024

    Aline Schwibbe, Berlin 2024.
  • Richard Serra, Siegen 2005

    Born Novem­ber 2. 1938
    San Fran­cisco, Cali­for­nia, U.S.
    Died March 26. 2024 (aged 85)
    Ori­ent, New York, U.S.

    Close-up portrait of Richard Serra.
    Richard Serra, Sie­gen 2005
  • Tine Furler / Oliver Mark „untitled“ 63,0 x 53,0 cm, embroidery framed 2022

    Tine Furler: Oliver Mark „untitled“ 63,0 x 53,0 cm, embroidery framed 2022.
  • Michael Sailstorfer / Oliver Mark, „Heavy Eyes — Chartreuse“ 70 x 50 cm, eyeshadow on Photography 2022

    Michael Sailstorfer / Oliver Mark, „Heavy Eyes - Chartreuse“ 70 x 50 cm, eyeshadow on Photography (Hahnemühle) 2022.
  • Jungbrunnen, Berlin 2015

    Gelat­in sil­ver print, 68,0 x 100,5 cm (prin­ted 2015)

    Jungbrunnen, Berlin.

    Der Jun­g­brunnen ist ein Gemälde von Lucas Cranach dem Älter­en aus dem Jahr 1546.
    Das Bild gehörte zum Best­and der ehem­a­li­gen preußis­chen könig­lichen Schlöss­er und hängt heute in der Gemälde­galer­ie der Staat­lichen Museen zu Ber­lin. Oliv­er Mark Jun­g­brunnen ist 2015 in Ber­lin entstanden und wurde erst­mals in Oliv­er Mark Aus­s­tel­lung No Show 2019 in der Villa Des­sauer – Museen der Stadt Bam­berg gezeigt.

  • Georg Maria Roers SJ , Berlin 2022

    Georg Maria Roers SJ , Berlin 2022.
  • Ulrika Segerberg, Berlin 2024

    Ulrika Segerberg in her Berlin Studio.
  • Kristen Stewart, Hamburg 2017

    Kristen Stewart, Hamburg 2017.
  • Büro, 2024

    Büro, 2024
    Büro, 2024
  • Louise Bourgeois

    Louise Bourgeois im Monopol – Magazin.
  • stand with Ukraine, Berlin 2024

    Stand with Ukraine Reichstag.
  • Valentin Vallhonrat, Madrid 2023

    Valentin Vallhonrat, Madrid 2023.
    Valentin Vall­hon­rat, Mad­rid 2023
  • Kunsthalle Würth, 2024

    SWR Kultur — Künstlerporträts.
    “Die Fotosammlung Platen“ in der Kunsthalle Würth in Schwäbisch Hall

  • Daniel Richter, Berlin 2017

    Daniel Richter, Berlin 2017.
  • Wolfgang Schäuble, Berlin 2007

    * Septem­ber 1942 in Freiburg im Bre­is­gau; † 26. Dezem­ber 2023 in Offenburg.

  • “Nun ist der erste Schnee gefallen” (2) 2023

    Nun ist der erste Schnee gefallen.
  • “Nun ist der erste Schnee gefallen” (1) 28.11.2023

    “Nun ist der erste Schnee gefallen”.
  • Phoenix Canariensis II, 2023

  • MUSEO VIII 001

    MUSEO VIII 001.
  • MUSEO VIII 006

    Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza

    MUSEO 2021 — 2023 

    Authors know the fear of the blank page, the dis­ap­prov­ing blink of the curs­or, frozen in place. Paint­ers know it too, the hor­ror vacui, the pan­ic when faced with the empti­ness of a blank can­vas. Pho­to­graph­ers tend not to because there is always a counter-image in the view­find­er. It doesn’t have to be beau­ti­ful, but it’s there – unless of course, you for­get to charge the bat­tery or for­get the shut­ter cap. Of course, this would nev­er hap­pen to a ser­i­ous daguerreotypist.

    Oliv­er Mark is tack­ling exactly this blank­ness – and doing it in the midst of art’s holi­est temples, the museums and gal­ler­ies. The places where block­busters of art his­tory usu­ally hang exal­ted on the walls for pleas­ant con­tem­pla­tion. As a rule, the paint­ing is placed at the cen­ter of the van­ish­ing line, at eye level to the view­er, and typ­ic­ally in a heavy, dec­or­at­ive frame – as if the eye did not have enough visu­al guid­ance already. The paint­ing is forced upon the view­er. And like air­port archi­tec­ture, the visitor’s path inev­it­ably always ends up in the duty-free sec­tion of the can­on of art, the art­work itself filling the spec­trum of per­cep­tion. It can­not be overlooked.

    Mark, how­ever, does over­look it, he pos­i­tions his cam­era at floor level and takes pic­tures from a worm’s eye view, using only his wal­let as a tri­pod. The angle of the lens and thus the view field is adjus­ted by adding or remov­ing a few coins. If this is not a razor-sharp ana­lys­is of the art mar­ket and a bit­ing cri­tique of the inter­pret­ive sov­er­eignty of money, then I’ll eat a crit­ic­al com­plete edi­tion of Bazon Brock. Or, maybe Mark just stumbled and fell, or found him­self in the micro-world of the micro-verse like the phys­ic­ally shrink­ing prot­ag­on­ist in Jack Arnold’s clas­sic film about 1950s para­noia, “The Incred­ible Shrink­ing Man.” Or, maybe Mark’s back just hurts and he’s mak­ing the best of the situ­ation before get­ting to the osteo­path. But I digress.

    Regard­less of how he arrived at this view field, his pho­to­graphs alter our per­cep­tion. Sud­denly, oth­er details move into the spot­light: elec­tric­al out­lets, pro­tect­ive grilles, humid­i­fi­ers, fire hoses, emer­gency exit signs, base­boards, spacers, and empti­ness. The unex­cit­ing­ness of white­washed mono­chrome walls, cracked edges, or dark-colored walls that reveal only a small seg­ment of the paint­ing that the wall was built for. Instead of con­tem­plat­ing a de Chirico, I lose myself in the Capri blue of the wall paint dom­in­ant in the pho­to­graph. Just not acknow­ledging any­thing, just enjoy­ing the chill-out zone of the Pantone rave, ignor­ing the grav­itas of the paint­ing, tak­ing in the empti­ness with my eyes.

    This has more than a med­it­at­ive effect, it recon­tex­tu­al­izes the art. The moment you become aware of the sup­port­ing mech­an­isms of the present­a­tion mod­us – the mov­able walls, bar­ri­ers, motion detect­ors, benches – Benjamin’s aura of the ori­gin­al dis­ap­pears. The work of art appears as a com­mod­ity along­side oth­ers: here a sock­et, there a Renais­sance. One recog­nizes again that art func­tions sim­il­arly to paper money: Its arti­facts are charged with mean­ing, but their mater­i­al value is often rel­at­ively low. Their value lies in the com­mon agree­ment that the art work in ques­tion is of relevance.

    And in the angle of view. We are a visu­ally driv­en spe­cies. Out of sight out of mind does not only apply to small chil­dren. We con­struct real­ity through the optic nerve much more than through feel­ing or hear­ing. The Icon­ic Turn and all that. If you take away the icons from the Icon­ic Turn, would it still exist? Or does Wazlawick’s ver­dict, that we can­not not com­mu­nic­ate, also apply to art? You can­not not depict. Does that make Malevich’s Black Square nat­ur­al­ism, sym­bol­ism, abstrac­tion or a pre­lim­in­ary study for the col­or swatches in the print­ing industry? We are fas­cin­ated by the magic of the simple, sol­id tone. Our brain is always search­ing for recog­niz­ab­il­ity, and the absence of pat­tern is jar­ring. Star­ing at the wall: Oliv­er Mark has giv­en new mean­ing to the idiom – and has made me want to view everything from a cross-legged seated pos­i­tion the next time I vis­it a museum.

    Till Schröder, Edit­or-in-Chief of Mar­gin­ali­en and own­er of the Gretan­ton Ver­lag.

  • MUSEO VIII 002, 2023

  • Isa Melsheimer, Madrid 2023

    Isa Melsheimer, Mardird 2023.
    Isa Melsheimer, Mardird 2023
  • Madrid 23.11.2023 16:44

    23.11.2023 16:44.
    23.11.2023 16:44
  • Emeka Ogboh, Berlin 2023

    Emeka Ogboh in Oliver Marks Studio in the sky.
  • Isa Melsheimer , Auberville-la-Renault 2023

    Isa Melsheimer II, Auberville-la-Renault 2023.
  • Thomas Scheibitz, Berlin 2023

    The artist Thomas Scheibitz in his Studio.
  • Vladyslav Tian, Berlin 2023

    Vladyslav Tian in Oliver Mark´s Studio in the sky, Berlin 2023.
  • Aline Schwibbe, Berlin 2023

    Aline Schwibbe in her Berlin Studio.
  • Klaus Mertes SJ, Berlin 2023

    Klaus Mertes SJ in Oliver Mark Stuido in the sky.
  • Polina Shcherbyna, Berlin 2023

    Polina Shcherbyna in Oliver Mark´s Studio in the sky.
  • Richard Roberts, Berlin 2023

    Richard Roberts in his Berlin Studio.
  • Julia Beliaeva, Berlin 2023

    The artist Julia Beliaeva in Olver Mark´s Berlin Studio in the sky.
  • Himmel über Berlin, 2023

  • 2023

    Platz der Vereinten Nationen.
  • Urban Species I, 2021–2023

    Urban Species I, 2021-2023.
  • VALIE EXPORT, Wien 2023

  • Daniel Spoerri, Wien 2023

    Daniel Spoerri in seiner Wiener Wohnung.
  • Timm Ulrichs, Berlin 2023

    Timm Ulrichs, Berlin 2023.
  • DGPh im Sprengel Museum Hannover

    "Bildeingriffe" untersucht und diskutiert unterschiedliche Formen von Eingriffen in fotografische Bilder.
  • Gerd Rohling, Berlin 2023

  • Klaus Mosettig, Wien 2023

    Klaus Mosettig, Wien 2023
  • Sabine Reinfeld, Berlin 2023

  • Hamburger Bahnhof – Nationalgalerie der Gegenwart

    Broken Music Vol. 2
    70 Jahre Schall­plat­ten und Sound­arbeiten von Künstler*innen
    17.12.2022 bis 14.05.2023

  • MUSEO VI/05

    Aus der Serie “MUSEO VI”, entstanden im Alten Museum Ber­lin, 2023
  • Isa Melsheimer, Berlin 2022

  • Die Vögel des Zufalls

    “Die Vögel des Zufalls” ist eine Aus­s­tel­lung kur­atiert von Thomas Zitzwitz in der Galer­ie Norbert Arns in Köln, 18.11. – 10.12.2022.

    Ein ver­bind­lich­er Aus­druck des Zufäl­li­gen prägt auch die Por­traits von Oliv­er Mark. Die Auf­nahme von Rain­er Maria Kar­din­al Woelki (2012) ist z.B. nach einem Shoot­ing für Die Zeit entstanden. Mark war die Spielothek, vor der er Woelki ablichtete, schon auf dem Weg zum Shoot­ing aufge­fallen. Er war­tete aber die geplanten Auf­nah­men ab, um ein­en entspan­nten Woelki dann erst auf dem Rück­weg zu sein­er Wohnung im Wed­ding anzuhal­ten und spon­tan zu knipsen. „Kar­din­al Woelki, dre­hen Sie sich mal um!“ Woelki lacht – und das Bild ist fer­tig. Wie bei Lay war auch hier die spon­tan wirkende Auf­nahme lange geplant und vorbereit­et. Marks Por­trait des Künst­lers Tobi­as Hant­mann (2020) hatte ein­en ähn­lich lan­gen Vor­lauf und kom­bin­iert eine Land­schafts­ser­ie von Mark mit sein­en Künst­ler­por­traits. Die Land­schafts­ser­ie heißt Die Zeit machen wir später aus und por­trait­iert Orte im Wan­del, z.B. Baus­tel­len wie hier des Axel Spring­er Neubaus in Ber­lin. Die ein­zelnen Bilder hal­ten ein­en Blick fest, den es so nur kur­ze Zeit gibt und der dann ver­schwin­det. So ein­en Blick zeigt auch das Por­trait von Hant­mann, den Mark auf ein­er Party kennen- gel­ernt und dann instru­iert hatte, was er tra­gen und wohin er kom­men soll­te. Auch die Beleuch­tung der Auf­nahme ist präzise geset­zt (Tages­licht von rechts, Gegen­blitz von links). Die Tasche hat Hant­mann aber selbst mit­ge­b­racht. Mark hatte sich nur irgendein Accessoire gewün­scht. Dieses zufäl­lige Requis­it ent­fal­tet jedoch eine große Wirkung, weil es die Hal­tung Hant­manns bestim­mt und ein­en starken farb­lichen Kon­trast im fast mono­chro­men Bild set­zt. Woel­kis Spielothek und Hant­manns Tasche zei­gen, wie auch in Marks Auf­nah­men die Anbrandun­gen des Zufalls das Bild bestimmen.

    Björn Ved­der
  • Franziska Goes, Berlin 2022

    The artist Franziska Goes holding a color fan in her hand.
  • Daniel Mohr / Oliver Mark – „untitled“

    40,0 × 50,0 cm, Oil paint on pho­to­graphy, 2022. From Col­lab­or­a­tions II.
  • Oliver Mark Studio Berlin, 2010–2022

  • O P E N Berlin, 2022

    Deliv­ery Hero – Isa Melsheimer and Oliv­er Mark
    18.08.2022–15.09.2022

    Blick­di­cht im Glasdickicht

    Gibt es etwas zu sehen und zu bewahren, schlägt die Stunde der Vit­rine. Der Glaskasten als Pan­ic Room der Museo­lo­gen, am lieb­sten Pan­zer­glas, UV-Schutz und Vak­uum. Kon­ser­vier­ung wie im Marme­ladenglas. Schutz vor Zer­fall ist unbedingt löb­lich, doch erfahren Objekte ihren musealen, respekt­ive gesell­schaft­lichen Wert meist durch Nutzungsspuren: abgew­ien­erte Ober­flächen, Schar­rten, Ver­fär­bun­gen, Verb­lichenes, Abgebrochenes. Der Zahn der Zeit nagte, und wir füh­len Ver­bund­en­heit mit der Ver­gan­gen­heit. Er erst macht Geschichte für uns wirk­lich lebendig.

    Zum ander­en der Blick des Betrachters. Er tastet die Ober­fläche prüfend ab, in der Vit­rine aber schaut er auch hindurch, sieht den Raum dah­inter, den Kon­text der Jet­ztzeit. Das Glas spiegelt die Umge­bung, den Betrachter, auch das Selbst, wenn wir hier kurz küchen­psy­cho­lo­gis­ier­en dür­fen. Die Vit­rine lädt zum visuel­len Dia­log. Ob der ein­spurig und mehr­spurig ver­läuft, hängt am Betrachter.

    Oliv­er Marks Foto­grafi­en und Isa Melsheimers Skulp­turen interessier­en dieser ständige Blick­wech­sel. Das Objekt der Begierde ist nicht in der Vit­rine, es ist die Vit­rine und ihre Über­ras­chun­gen offen­bar­en­de Blick­di­chte. Dichte nicht im Sinne von Sichts­chutz, son­dern von erhöhtem Schauwert, der Häu­fung der mög­lichen Blick­winkel. Sind es bei Mark uner­war­tete Bildausschnitte, die schein­bar willkür­liche Darstel­lung von Teilen der Vit­rine, auch ander­en Sicht­gren­zenset­zer, wie Flug­zeug­flü­gel, Ver­pack­un­gen, col­la­gierte Hände, ist es bei Melsheimer die Paar­ung Beton und Glas. Beton als Sichtver­hinder­er, Glas als Blick­er­mög­lich­er. Ihre Serie »Seeds« beis­piels­weise hin­ter­fragt die Funk­tion der Vit­rine auf eigene Weise: Glaskästen auf Beton­sock­eln, in den­en Samen ein luftdi­cht abges­chot­tetes Eigen­leben entwick­eln, ein­zig gespeist aus Sonnen­licht, Erde und durch Kondens­a­tion entstehende Flüssigkeit. Hier ist nichts kon­ser­viert, hier lebt etwas, aber unter dem Blick des Betrachters. Ich sehe, also lebst du. Die In-Vitro-Vit­rine des Kunstmarkts.

    Oliv­er Mark und Isa Melsheimer gehen dem Guck­kasten auf den Geist. Wer kom­mt und schaut, erlangt ihn viel­leicht, den blick­di­cht­en Durchblick im Glasdickicht.

    Till Schröder, Autor, Chefredak­teur der Mar­gin­ali­en – Zeits­chrift für Bib­li­o­philie und Buchkunst
  • THRESHOLD

    Tim Plamper & Oliv­er Mark – A °CLAIRbyKahn Exclus­ive at photo basel

    °CLAIRbyKahn is pleased to unveil Schwelle („Threshold“), a series of unique mul­ti­me­dia works by pho­to­graph­er Oliv­er Mark in col­lab­or­a­tion with visu­al artist Tim Plamper. After being invited by Mark to alter his pho­to­graphs, Plamper co-cre­ated this series using soil taken from the former Inner Ger­man Bor­der, reopen­ing wounds of the past in a ges­ture that expands our under­stand­ing of the geo­pol­it­ic­al dis­putes of today. 

    photo basel” takes places from 06/14–06/19/2022 – you’ll find us at booth A9!

    Volk­shaus Basel
    Reb­gasse 12–14
    CH-4058 Basel

  • Collaborations I

    „Collaborations I“ by Oliver Mark.

    Guardini Stif­tung, 2022

    Ed. Oliv­er Mark and Guardini Stif­tung. Concept and Organ­iz­a­tion: Oliv­er Mark. Design: Stein­ig, studiof.de. Text: Georg Maria Roers SJ. Trans­la­tion: Chris­toph­er Winter. Print: Druckerei Heenemann. 

    View Pro­ject · View Exhib­i­tion · Down­load

  • Guardini Stiftung, Berlin 2022

    Col­lab­or­a­tions I – An Exhib­i­tion with 61 Artists
    Guardini Stif­tung, Askan­is­cher Pl. 4, 10963 Ber­lin
    06.04.2022–11.05.2022

    Oliv­er Mark invited 61 artists to work on his pho­tos. Any­thing could be done to them: cut­ting, scratch­ing, twist­ing, fram­ing, past­ing, mount­ing, embroid­er­ing and paint­ing bey­ond recog­ni­tion. The inter­ven­tions were as sur­pris­ing as they were innov­at­ive. The format was vari­able – so was the type of photo paper. Some­times the photo was glossy or matt, some­times on baryta paper, hahnemühle paper or can­vas, etc. It was up to the artists to decide. Two prints were made, with one work remain­ing with each artist.  The exhib­i­tion was made pos­sible with the sup­port of the Arch­diocese of Ber­lin, Fath­er Georg Maria Roers SJ and the Asso­ci­ation Aus­s­tel­lung­shaus für christ­liche Kunst e. V.

    Artists: Saâdane AfifMat­thi­as Beck­mannOlivia Ber­ck­e­mey­erEva Ber­endesDaniel BiesoldNorbert BiskyAnina Brisolla – Laura BruceMaria Brun­nerJoanna Buchow­skaAndreas BunteBjörn Dah­lemGior­gio de ChiricoSven-Ole FrahmTine Furl­er – Fran­ziska GoesLen­nart GrauGregor HildebrandtPhilip GrözingerHar­ald Her­mannEllen Mar­tine HeuserBene­dikt Hipp – Chris­ti­an Hois­chen – Shaikh Rashid bin Khal­ifa Al Khal­ifaFlor­in Kom­patscherTimo Kloep­pelClem­ens KraussMichael Kun­zeWolfgang Lug­mairVia Lewan­dowskyBernhard Mar­tinIsa MelsheimerKlaus Moset­tigFrank NitscheAgustin Noguera – Ena Oppen­heimerLea Pagen­kem­perTim Plamper – Man­fred PecklSabine Rein­feldLisa Reit­mei­er – Bene­dikt Rich­ertGerd RohlingMichael Sail­stor­ferKarin Sander – Sophia Schama – Thomas Scheib­itzAline SchwibbeJohanna Sil­ber­mannHeidi SillYas­min Shar­abiSabine Spring­er – Philip Topo­lo­vacChris­toph­er WinterHansa WißkirchenCarsten WirthAngelika ZellerSarah Zel­matiRalf Zier­vo­gelThomas ZitzwitzFilip Zorzor

  • Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, 2020–2021

    In aller Munde – Von Pieter Brue­gel bis Cindy Sher­man
    31.10.2020–05.04.2021

    (v. l. n. r.) Edvard Munch, Wal­ter Crane, Louise Bour­geois, Trock­el Rose­marie, Oliv­er Mark.
    Nicole Hackert's baby looking at camera while sucking on a vampire dummy.
    Vicco mit Vam­pir Schnuller, Ber­lin 2009

    Mund, Lip­pen, Zunge und Zähne, Sprache, Schmerz und Schrei, Essen, Schlin­gen, Spei­en und Spuck­en, Lust und Leidenschaft: Die Mund­höhle ist eine buch­stäb­lich reiz­volle Körperzone. So haben sich nicht nur seit jeher Natur­wis­senschaft und Med­iz­in an der Erkundung der Mund­höhle abgearbeitet, son­dern auch die Kunst- und Kul­turgeschichte – von der Anti­ke bis zur Geg­en­wart. Diesen breit gefäch­er­ten motivgeschicht­lichen Pfad ver­fol­gt das Kun­st­mu­seum Wolfs­burg mit der Aus­s­tel­lung In aller Munde. Von Pieter Brue­gel bis Cindy Sher­man. Es ist die bis­lang umfassend­ste The­menaus­s­tel­lung zu oralen Motiven in der Kunst in Deutsch­land mit über 250 Expo­naten unter ander­em von  Albrecht Dürer, Pablo Picas­so, Max Klinger, Mar­ina Abramović, Andy War­hol und Louise Bourgeois.

    Die breit angelegte Aus­s­tel­lung wid­met sich Mon­ster­mäulern (Alfred Kubin) und Vam­pir­bis­sen (Edvard Munch), betrachtet den Mund als Höl­lenschlund und Tor zum Wel­tinnen­raum (Pieter Brue­gel). Die Dentalkul­tur wie­der­um wird vielfältig beleuchtet vom Zahn­brech­er bei Jan Steen über die Darstel­lung der Schutzhei­li­gen von Zahnärzten, Apol­lo­nia, bei Andy War­hol bis hin zu Zahnschmuck aus außereuropäis­chen Kul­turen. Mona Hat­oum dringt bis in die Speiser­öhre vor, während Künst­ler wie Man Ray oder Anselmo Fox ihren Atem in Glas‑, Seifen- oder Kaugum­miblasen einsch­ließen. Und schließ­lich ist die Ästhet­ik der Lip­pen, gesteigert im Kuss und der oralen Libido ein Sujet, mit dem sich Wolfgang Till­mans, Nat­alia LL, Picas­so, Mar­ilyn Minter und viele andere in der Schau beschäfti­gen. In aller Munde umfasst sowohl Malerei, Skulp­tur, Install­a­tion, Foto­grafie, Zeich­nung, Grafik und Videok­unst als auch ein­zel­ne Expo­nate aus eth­no­lo­gis­chen und naturwissen­schaft­lichen Sammlungen, Film und Wer­bung, Musik und Literatur.

    Die Schau In aller Munde wird kur­atiert von Dr. Uta Ruhkamp und entsteht in Zusammen­arbeit mit dem Kul­tur­wis­senschaftler Prof. Dr. Hart­mut Böhme und der Zahnärzt­in Beate Slominski.

    Künstler*innen: Hans von Aachen (Umkre­is), Mar­ina Abramović & Ulay, Vito Acconci, Nobuy­oshi Araki, Arman, Dir­ck Bar­en­d­sz, Len­ora de Bar­ros, Franz von Bayros, Dirk Bell, Johannes Bendzulla, Bernhard Johannes Blume, Louis-Léo­pold Boilly, Hieronymus Bosch (Nachfol­ger), Louise Bour­geois, Pieter Brue­gel d. Ä., Ant­on Büschel­ber­ger, Luca Cam­biaso, Javi­er Castro und Luis Gárciga, Jake & Dinos Chap­man, Francesco Clem­ente, Otto Coes­ter, Tony Cragg, Lucas Cranach d. Ä., Wal­ter Crane, Mar­tin Creed, John Cur­rin, Nat­alie Czech, Thomas Demand, François Desprez, Birgit Dieker, Mark Dion, Cheryl Doneg­an, Albrecht Dürer, Bogomir Eck­er, Ger­brand van den Eeck­hout, Antje Engel­mann, Fantich & Young, Har­un Farocki, Thomas Feuer­stein, Urs Fisc­her, Anselmo Fox, Mor­itz Frei, Lies­elotte Fried­laender, Gauri Gill, Fran­cisco de Goya y Lucientes, Vivi­an Gre­ven, Robert Haiss, Richard Hamilton, Johann Got­tlieb Hantz­sch, Mona Hat­oum, Eber­hard Havekost, He Xiangyu, Egbert van Heem­sker­ck d. J., Jeppe Hein, Gottfried Hel­n­wein, Gary Hill, Klara Hobza, Jenny Holzer, Ben­jamin Hou­li­han, Lisa Junghanß, Michael Kalmbach, Isa­bell Kamp, Chris­ti­an Kein­star, Johann Georg Kern (zuges­chr.), Walth­er Klemm, Max Klinger, Chris­toph Knecht, Her­linde Koel­bl, Kurt Kranz, Alfred Kubin, Math­äus Küsel, Raimund Kum­mer, Dav­id LaChapelle, Maria Lassnig, Lucas van Ley­den, Lee Loz­ano, Sarah Lucas, Anna Maria Maiolino, Jeanne Mam­men, Man Ray, Fabi­an Mar­cac­cio, Chris­ti­an Marclay, Teresa Mar­golles, Oliv­er Mark, Bernhard Mar­tin, Kris Mar­tin, Jonath­an Meese, Ulrich Meister, Isa Melsheimer, Ana Men­di­eta, Charles Mery­on, Franz Xaver Mess­er­schmidt, Mar­ilyn Minter, Edvard Munch, Bar­to­lomé Esteban Mur­illo (zuges­chr.), Nat­alia LL, Bruce Nau­man, Mar­cel Oden­bach, Adolf Oexle, Tony Oursler, Georg Pencz, Pablo Picas­so, Rona Pon­dick, François Rabelais, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Pipi­lotti Rist, Michele Rocca, Ulrike Rosen­bach, Aura Rosen­berg, Miguel Roth­schild, Raphael Sadel­er d. Ä., Sam Sam­ore, Johann Gottfried Schad­ow, God­fried Schal­ck­en, Thomas Schütte, Lorentz Schultes, Elfie Semotan, Mithu Sen, Cindy Sher­man, Slavs and Tatars, Andreas Slo­m­in­ski, Kiki Smith, Daniel Spo­erri, Shaun Stamp, Peter Stauss, Jan Steen, Bar­bara Steppe, Sam Taylor-John­son, Dav­id Ten­iers d. J., Paul Thek, Wolfgang Till­mans, Joe Tilson, Ane Tonga, Rose­marie Trock­el, Wil­helm Trüb­n­er, Pio­tr Uklański, Maarten de Vos, Kemang Wa Lehulere, Franz Erhard Walth­er, Andy War­hol, Hans Wecht­lin, Peter Wei­bel, Hans Weiditz d. J., Tom Wessel­mann, Ant­onie Wierix, Peter Zizka u. a.

  • Leerstunde

    Autoren kennen das, die Angst vor dem leer­en Blatt, das vor­wurf­s­volle Blinken des Curs­ors, der auf der Stelle wie festge­froren ver­har­rt. Maler kennen ihn auch, den Hor­ror vacui, die Pan­ik angesichts der Leere ein­er unber­ührten Lein­wand. Foto­grafen eher nicht, schliess­lich zeigt der Such­er stets ein Gegen­bild. Muss ja nicht schön sein, aber ist eben da – leer­er Akku oder ver­gessene Ver­schlusskappe mal außen vorgelassen. Sowas passiert einem ser­iösen Daguerreotyp­isten natür­lich nicht.

    Oliv­er Mark nun packt die Leere bei den Hörnern – und das mit­ten in den Tem­peln der Kun­stehr­furcht. An den Orten, in den­en gewöhn­lich die Block­buster der Kun­st­geschichte zur gefäl­li­gen Betrach­tung altar­is­iert an den Wänden hän­gen – Museen und Galer­i­en. Das Gemälde steht im Zen­trum der Flucht­linie, auf Augen­höhe der Betrachter, meist in orna­mentschwer­en Rah­men, als würde das Auge nicht schon genug Blick­führung erfahren. Das Bild wird dem Betrachter aufgezwun­gen. Flughafen­ar­chitek­turen ähnelnd endet der Weg des Besuch­ers unwei­ger­lich im Duty-free-Shop des Kun­stkan­ons, das Kunstwerk an sich füllt das Wahrnehmungsspek­trum. Man kann eigent­lich nicht vorbeischauen.

    Mark aber schaut vorbei, er pos­i­tioniert seine Kam­era auf Fuss­bod­en­höhe und knipst aus Froschper­spekt­ive, ein­zig sein Porte­mon­naies als Stat­iv nutzend. Die Ent­nahme oder Zugabe von Geld­stück­en bestim­mt den Nei­gung­swinkel des Objekt­ivs und dam­it das Blick­feld. Wenn das nicht eine mess­er­schar­fen Ana­lyse des Kun­st­markts ist, eine beißende Kritik an der Deu­tung­sho­heit des Geldes, dann fresse ich eine krit­ische Ges­amtaus­gabe von Bazon Brock. Oder, Mark ist ein­fach nur gestolp­ert – und fand sich unver­mit­telt wieder in der Nis­chen­welt des Mik­rover­sums wie der ato­mar schwindende Prot­ag­on­ist in Jack Arnolds Filmk­lassiker der 1950er Para­noia The Incred­ible Shrink­ing Man. Oder, Mark hat ein­fach nur Rück­en und macht das Beste aus sein­er Situ­ation, bevor er es zum Osteo­pa­th­en schafft. Aber ich sch­weife ab.

    Egal wie er zu seinem Blick gekom­men ist, die Per­spekt­ive sein­er Foto­grafi­en ver­ändert Wahrnehmung. Plötz­lich rück­en Details ins Rampen­licht: Steck­dosen, Schutzgit­ter, Luftbe­feuchter, Feuer­wehr­schläuche, Notaus­gangsschilder, Sch­euer­leisten, Abstand­hal­ter – und Leere. Die Unaufgereg­theit mono­chro­mat­isch getünchter Wände, ris­siger Kanten, dunk­ler Wände, die nur Aus­schnitte der präsen­tier­ten Bilder pre­is­geben, für die die Wand gemacht wurde. Statt im Motiv von de Chirico zu sin­nier­en, ver­liere ich mich im Capriblau der Wand­farbe, die das Foto domin­iert. In der Chil­lout-Zone des Pantone-Raves ein­fach mal nichts erkennen, die Grav­itas des Gemäldes ignor­i­er­en, nur Leere mit den Augen ertasten.

    Das hat nicht nur ein­en med­it­at­iven Effekt, es rekon­tex­tu­al­is­iert Kunst. In dem Moment, wo man sich der Stützräder der Präsent­a­tionsmodi gewahr wird – die Stell­wände, Absper­rungen, Bewe­gungs­meld­er, Sitzbänke – geht Ben­jamins Aura des Ori­gin­als flöten. Das Kunstwerk erscheint als Geb­rauchs­ge­gen­stand neben ander­en: hier Steck­dose, dort Renais­sance. Man erken­nt wieder, dass Kunst ähn­lich wie Papi­ergeld funk­tioniert: Ihre Arte­fakte wer­den mit Bedeu­tung aufge­laden, ihr Mater­i­al­wert ist oft genug ger­ing. Ihr Schatz liegt in der gemein­samen Ver­ein­bar­ung aller, dass genau diese Kunst Rel­ev­anz besitzt.

    Und im Blick­winkel. Wir sind eine optisch getriebene Spez­ies. Aus dem Auge aus dem Sinn gilt nicht nur für Klein­kinder. Wir kon­stru­ier­en Real­ität über den Sehnerv, viel mehr als über Füh­len oder Hören. Icon­ic Turn und so. Nim­mt man dem Icon­ic Turn nun die Motive, ist er dann noch exist­ent? Oder gilt Wazlawicks Ver­dikt, man könne nicht nicht kom­mun­iz­ier­en, auch in der Kunst? Man kann nicht nicht abbilden. Ist Malewitsches Schwar­zes Quad­ratnun Nat­ur­al­is­mus, Sym­bol­ismus, Abstrak­tion oder Vor­stud­ie für die Farb­fäch­er der Druc­kin­dus­trie? Die Magie des Voll­tons fasziniert. Die Abwesen­heit von Muster irrit­iert unser Gehirn, das stets nach Wie­der­erken­nbarkeit fahndet. Die Wand ans­tar­ren: Oliv­er Mark hat der Redewendung wieder neues Fut­ter gegeben – und mir den Wun­sch, beim näch­sten Museums­besuch ein­mal alles im Schneidersitz zu betrachten.

    Till Schröder, Chefredak­teur der Mar­gin­ali­en und Inhab­er des Gretan­ton Verlags

    Authors know the fear of the blank page, the dis­ap­prov­ing blink of the curs­or, frozen in place. Paint­ers know it too, the hor­ror vacui, the pan­ic when faced with the empti­ness of a blank can­vas. Pho­to­graph­ers tend not to because there is always a counter-image in the view­find­er. It doesn’t have to be beau­ti­ful, but it’s there – unless of course, you for­get to charge the bat­tery or for­get the shut­ter cap. Of course, this would nev­er hap­pen to a ser­i­ous daguerreotypist.

    Oliv­er Mark is tack­ling exactly this blank­ness – and doing it in the midst of art’s holi­est temples, the museums and gal­ler­ies. The places where block­busters of art his­tory usu­ally hang exal­ted on the walls for pleas­ant con­tem­pla­tion. As a rule, the paint­ing is placed at the cen­ter of the van­ish­ing line, at eye level to the view­er, and typ­ic­ally in a heavy, dec­or­at­ive frame – as if the eye did not have enough visu­al guid­ance already. The paint­ing is forced upon the view­er. And like air­port archi­tec­ture, the visitor’s path inev­it­ably always ends up in the duty-free sec­tion of the can­on of art, the art­work itself filling the spec­trum of per­cep­tion. It can­not be overlooked. 

    Mark, how­ever, does over­look it, he pos­i­tions his cam­era at floor level and takes pic­tures from a worm’s eye view, using only his wal­let as a tri­pod. The angle of the lens and thus the view field is adjus­ted by adding or remov­ing a few coins. If this is not a razor-sharp ana­lys­is of the art mar­ket and a bit­ing cri­tique of the inter­pret­ive sov­er­eignty of money, then I’ll eat a crit­ic­al com­plete edi­tion of Bazon Brock. Or, maybe Mark just stumbled and fell, or found him­self in the micro-world of the micro-verse like the phys­ic­ally shrink­ing prot­ag­on­ist in Jack Arnold’s clas­sic film about 1950s para­noia, “The Incred­ible Shrink­ing Man.” Or, maybe Mark’s back just hurts and he’s mak­ing the best of the situ­ation before get­ting to the osteo­path. But I digress.

    Regard­less of how he arrived at this view field, his pho­to­graphs alter our per­cep­tion. Sud­denly, oth­er details move into the spot­light: elec­tric­al out­lets, pro­tect­ive grilles, humid­i­fi­ers, fire hoses, emer­gency exit signs, base­boards, spacers, and empti­ness. The unex­cit­ing­ness of white­washed mono­chrome walls, cracked edges, or dark-colored walls that reveal only a small seg­ment of the paint­ing that the wall was built for. Instead of con­tem­plat­ing a de Chirico, I lose myself in the Capri blue of the wall paint dom­in­ant in the pho­to­graph. Just not acknow­ledging any­thing, just enjoy­ing the chill-out zone of the Pantone rave, ignor­ing the grav­itas of the paint­ing, tak­ing in the empti­ness with my eyes.

    This has more than a med­it­at­ive effect, it recon­tex­tu­al­izes the art. The moment you become aware of the sup­port­ing mech­an­isms of the present­a­tion mod­us – the mov­able walls, bar­ri­ers, motion detect­ors, benches – Benjamin’s aura of the ori­gin­al dis­ap­pears. The work of art appears as a com­mod­ity along­side oth­ers: here a sock­et, there a Renais­sance. One recog­nizes again that art func­tions sim­il­arly to paper money: Its arti­facts are charged with mean­ing, but their mater­i­al value is often rel­at­ively low. Their value lies in the com­mon agree­ment that the art work in ques­tion is of relevance.

    And in the angle of view. We are a visu­ally driv­en spe­cies. Out of sight out of mind does not only apply to small chil­dren. We con­struct real­ity through the optic nerve much more than through feel­ing or hear­ing. The Icon­ic Turn and all that. If you take away the icons from the Icon­ic Turn, would it still exist? Or does Wazlawick’s ver­dict, that we can­not not com­mu­nic­ate, also apply to art? You can­not not depict. Does that make Malevich’s Black Square nat­ur­al­ism, sym­bol­ism, abstrac­tion or a pre­lim­in­ary study for the col­or swatches in the print­ing industry? We are fas­cin­ated by the magic of the simple, sol­id tone. Our brain is always search­ing for recog­niz­ab­il­ity, and the absence of pat­tern is jar­ring. Star­ing at the wall: Oliv­er Mark has giv­en new mean­ing to the idiom – and has made me want to view everything from a cross-legged seated pos­i­tion the next time I vis­it a museum.

    Till Schröder, Edit­or-in-Chief of Mar­gin­ali­en and own­er of the Gretan­ton Ver­lag.
  • Kanya Kage Art Space, Berlin 2021

    MUSEO
    Octo­ber 7, 2021 – Novem­ber 14, 2021

  • Der besondere Kick – Die Portraits von Oliver Mark

    Photonews-Artikel: „Der besondere Kick – Die Portraits von Oliver Mark“.

    Claudia Kur­sawe, PHOTONEWS.

  • Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin 2021

    White and Clean
    Künst­ler­haus Beth­anien, Ber­lin
    STUDIO 225  / BERCKEMEYER

    Pop-Up Exhib­i­tion with Alicja Kwade, Antje Blu­men­stein, Armin Boehm, Björn Dah­lem, Erik Schmidt, Eva Gru­binger, Eva-Maria Wilde, Frank Nitsche, Gab­ri­el de la Mora, Gregor Hildebrandt, Hansa Wis­skirchen, Isa Melsheimer, Kristina Nagel, Lisa Junghans, Lud­wig Kreutzer, Olivia Ber­ck­e­mey­er, Hois­chen / Mark , Mar­cel Duch­amp, Man­fred Peckl, Mat­thi­as Hes­sel­bach­er, Marten Frerichs, Sophia Scharma, Stephanie Kloss , Susanne Goll­witzer, Svenja Kreh, Tat­jana Doll, Tine Furler.

  • In aller Munde

    „In aller Munde – Das Orale in Kunst und Kultur“. Hatje Cantz,2020.

    Hatje Cantz, 2020

    Page 241: Vicco mit Vam­pir-Schnuller, Ber­lin 2009. C‑Print on Kodak Endura Metal­lic. Ed. Kun­st­mu­seum Wolfsburg

    Ger­man
    352 pages, 350 ills.
    Hard­cov­er
    24,00 × 31,00 cm
    ISBN 978–3‑7757–4799‑8

    View Exhib­i­tion

  • Krisen beziehen sich grundsätzlich immer auf die Abweichung von der Normalität

    blog.fotogloria.de

  • In eure Hände seien sie gegeben. Betrachtung von Oliver Marks Fotografie “Die Hände von Jenny Holzer”

    Georg Maria Roers SJ, Stimmen der Zeit.

  • „Alles fließt“ – Oliver Mark, Sibylle Springer und Sonja Ofen in der Gallery Lazarus Hamburg

    Isabelle Hofmann, kultur-port.de.

  • Der Funke Gottes!

    „Der Funke Gottes!“. Kerber Verlag, 2019.

    Ker­ber Ver­lag, 2019

    Page 97. Ed. Bam­ber­ger Diözesanmuseum.

    Ger­man
    120 pages, 70 ills.
    23,5 × 30 cm
    ISBN 978–3‑7356–0631‑0

    View Exhib­i­tion

  • Begabte Menschen treffen immer, auch wenn sie nicht zielen.

    „Begabte Menschen treffen immer, auch wenn sie nicht zielen.“ by Oliver Mark.

    Texts and Images: Ern­est Hem­ing­way, Chris­ti­an Hois­chen, Leiko Ikemura, Michael Kun­ze, Bjørn Mel­hus, Isa Melsheimer, Chris­toph Peters, Michael Sail­stor­fer, Sibylle Spring­er and Mar­tin Simons. Concept and Pho­to­graphs by Oliv­er Mark. Edited by Oliv­er Mark. Design: Anja Stein­ig, studiof.de.

    Down­load

  • Diözesanmuseum Bamberg, 2019

    Der Funke Gottes
    27.07.2019–10.11.2019

    Kur­atiert von Alex­an­der Ochs and Dr. Hol­ger Kemp­kens.
    Mit u. a.: Mar­ina Abramović, Ai Wei­wei, Nobuy­oshi Araki, Ernst Bar­lach, Georg Basel­itz, Joseph Beuys, Valer­ie Favre, Kath­ar­ina Fritsch, Leiko Ikemura, Wil­helm Lehm­bruck, Via Lewan­dowsky, Oliv­er Mark, Olaf Met­zel, Her­mann Nitsch, Mer­et Oppen­heim, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Andy Warhol.

    Im Jahr 2011 hat der Künst­ler Oliv­er Mark Bene­dikt XVI. foto­grafiert. Im prunk­vol­len Goldrah­men präsen­tiert sich das Ober­haupt der kath­ol­ischen Kirche jedoch nur aus­schnit­thaft. Ledig­lich die vor der Körper­mitte gehalten­en Hände sind in der Auf­nahme zu sehen. Die ein­z­igartige Stel­lung des Pap­stes wird durch Pek­t­or­ale und die ihm vorbe­haltene weiße Gewandung ver­deut­licht. Auch die in ihr­er Gegensätz­lich­keit sehr aus­sagekräftige Hal­tung sein­er Hände trägt zur Charak­ter­is­ier­ung bei. Akt­iv ist die Linke in rhet­or­ischem Ges­tus nach oben gerichtet. Die Rechte jedoch, die den golden­en Fisc­her­ring trägt, ist müde nach unten gewandt. Sowohl Ehre und Würde als auch die schwere Ver­ant­wor­tung, die mit diesem Amt ver­bunden sind, wer­den in eindrück­lich­er Weise in dem Porträt der Pap­sthände erfahrbar.

    Der Foto­graf Oliv­er Mark (*1963, Gelsenkirchen/Deutschland) inszen­iert Prom­in­ente in ungewöhn­lichen Posen. Sie zei­gen iron­is­che Kom­ment­are zum Status der Abge­lichteten, spielen mit Ver­satz­stück­en ihr­er Lebens- und Arbeit­swelt, wie bei dem Porträt der Bild­hauer­in Alicia Kwade, bei dem unklar bleibt, ob er sie in ihr­em Atelier vor ein­er neuen Arbeit inszen­iert, oder selbst die Kulisse sein­er Auf­nahme zusammenstellte.

    Auch der Maler Clem­ens Krauss fin­d­et sich in einem kom­men­ti­er­enden Ambi­ente zu seinem Werk. Der Künst­ler, der mit pas­tos, direkt auf die Wand gemal­ten, gesichtslosen Massen­in­szen­ier­ungen bekan­nt wurde, lagert auf einem Bett, das aus einem Museumkon­text stam­men kön­nte. Um ihn her­um Bilder von Krauss und ein blut­rot durchtränktes Hemd, das an die Per­form­ance von Her­mann Nitsch erin­nert. Minutiös plant er den Prozess, der für den Foto­grafen für das Gelin­gen eines Bildes aus­sch­laggebend sei. Mit dem Zufall arbeitet der Künst­ler nach eigen­er Aus­sage sel­ten. Als Stilmit­tel set­zt Mark mitunter schwul­stige Bilder­rah­men als Motiv ein, die als Span­nungs­ge­ber, als Begren­zung und Botschaft fungier­en. Sie erzeugte assozi­at­ive Nähe zur Alt­meister­malerei, ver­stärken das mehrmals in sei- nem Werk wieder­kehrende Motiv der Hände, wie die von Papst Bene­dikt, den er 2011 in Erfurt foto­grafierte. Als bek­ennender Christ (ZEIT, 2019) bearbeitet er auch immer wieder reli­giös ori­entierte The­men, wie die Schwar­z­weiß-Foto­grafie, in der­en Zen­trum ein Säugling, eingesch­la­gen in ein dunkles Tuch in den Him­mel schaut. Von sein­er Brust aus­ge­hend strebt ein heller Bereich, der Blat­twerk zu erkennen gibt und ver­mut­lich durch eine Dop­pel­be­lich­tung entstanden ist.

    Katja Triebe, 2019
  • Oliver Mark über das Scheitern

    Till Schröder, adc.de.

  • „no show. Oliver Mark“ – Porträtfotografien von Oliver Mark in der Bamberger Stadtgalerie Villa Dessauer

    Der Neue Wiesentbote.

  • Porträts von Oliver Mark. Spiele eines selbstbewussten Künstlersubjekts

    Frauke Maria Petry, Monopol Magazin.

    Monopol-Artikel: „Porträts von Oliver Mark“.
  • Villa Dessauer, Bamberg 2019

    No Show

  • No Show

    „No Show“ by Oliver Mark. Distanz, Berlin 2019.

    Dis­tanz Ver­lag, 2019

    The book is pub­lished on the occa­sion of the exhib­i­tion „No Show, Oliv­er Mark“ from 05.04.2019 to 02.06.2019 in the museums of the city of Bam­berg, Villa Dessauer.

    Ger­man, Eng­lish
    268 pages, 198 ills.
    23,5 x 29 cm
    ISBN 978–3‑95476–281‑1

    View Exhib­i­tion · Down­load

  • Portrait des Fotografen als Portraitist

    Christoph Peters, No Show. Distanz Verlag, Berlin 2019, ISBN 978–3‑95476–281‑1.

    Sow­ieso ist alles eine Frage des Lichts. Es fällt von links auf breit­er Front in den großen Raum, der zugleich als Stu­dio und Büro, und Galer­ie dient. Genau­gen­om­men müsste ich sagen: Es würde fallen, denn der Foto­graf, der mir bar­fuß in weißem T‑Shirt und ver­waschen grauer Hose die Tür öffnet, hat vor den Fen­stern im Mit­telteil dichte, schwar­ze Vorhänge zugezo­gen. Nur vorne, im Bereich des Schreibt­ischs, gleich hinter dem Eingang, darf das Licht unge­hindert here­in­brechen, dann erst wieder am Ende des Raums, wo die Sonne jet­zt, am frühen Mor­gen, eine Gruppe von drei Eis­bären aus Porzel­lan je nach Blick­winkel iron­isch oder dram­at­isch in Szene set­zt. Sie stehen auf einem Sock­el vor der eben­falls schwarz ver­hängten Rück­wand und brül­len gemein­sam den Him­mel an. Der Foto­graf fragt, was er mir zu trinken anbi­eten darf? „Gern ein­en Espresso “, sage ich. Wenig später bringt er mir aus der Küche den Espresso in einem Mokkatässchen aus Meiss­ner Porzel­lan. Ich kenne das Dekor, es heißt Reich­er Hof­drache und wurde 1730 nach japan­is­chen und chin­es­is­chen Vor­bildern für die könig­liche Tafel August des Starken ent­wor­fen, bis 1918 war es aus­schließ­lich dem Hof vorbe­hal­ten. Offen­bar teilen wir die Liebe zum Porzel­lan – zu Fig­uren und Geschirr gleich­er­maßen. Ich kenne sonst niemanden, der sich dafür begeistern kann. Die Wand den Fen­stern gegenüber ist bis unter die Decke mit Bildern gefüllt – hauptsäch­lich zeit­genöss­is­che Maler, die jedoch geradezu ent­ge­genge­set­zten ästhet­ischen Pos­i­tion zu fol­gen schein­en: Gestische Abstrak­tion fin­d­et sich neben Fig­ur­at­ivem, poet­isch Sur­reales fol­gt auf col­lageartige Kom­posi­tion­en. Dazwis­chen Foto­grafi­en, ein Barock­por­trait, sow­ie eine alte Madonnen­fig­ur aus far­big gefasstem Holz. Auf dem Bord dar­unter Klein­plastiken und ein sauber prä­par­iert­er Pfer­deschädel. Fast der ges­amte Boden im hinter­en Teil wird von einem anti­ken Her­iz Tep­pich in war­men Rot‑, Beige und Blautön­en bedeckt, so dass ich mich endgültig wie zu Hause fühle. Er endet vor einem breit­en Leder­sofa, das zugleich als Andeu­tung eines Raumteilers dient. Hier und da ein anti­ker Stuhl oder Tisch, jedes Stück einem ebenso eigen­wil­li­gen wie undog­mat­ischen Geschmack ents­prechend ausgewählt.„Lass uns kein Geb­rauch­s­por­trait machen, son­dern etwas anderes ver­suchen“, hatte ich dem Foto­grafen am Tele­fon gesagt. „Ist mir recht“, hatte er geant­wor­tet. Ich bin in einem graugrün­en Cord­anzug gekom­men und habe ein­en Rollkof­fer voller Kleider mit­ge­b­racht: den Fez, den mir mein türkischer Sufi-Sheikh vor zehn Jahren aufge­set­zt hat, dazu weite osman­is­che Hosen und das passende Hemd; Kur­ta Shal­war – die tra­di­tion­elle pakistan­is­che Kleidung –, mit buntem Schal und Turban; dann den Kimono, den ich bei der japan­is­chen Teezere­monie trage. Außer­dem habe ich ein­en pakistan­is­chen Geb­et­step­pich, mein­en Tes­bih und den japan­is­chen Fäch­er dabei. Der Foto­graf reagiert nicht im Ger­ing­sten ver­wun­dert oder gar befrem­det, als ich ihm zeige, was sich im Kof­fer befin­d­et, im Gegen­teil: Er scheint es völ­lig nor­mal zu find­en, dass jemand derlei Dinge für eine Por­trait anschleppt, das keineswegs der Ankündi­gung eines Masken­balls oder ein­er Faschings­sitzung dient, während ich mir in diesem Moment die Frage stelle, ob es Kostümier­ungen, Iden­titäten oder doch Ver­such­san­ord­nun­gen sind? Ich den­ke: Viel­leicht macht er deshalb so gute Por­traits, weil er sein Gegenüber nicht wer­tet, son­dern ein­fach nur hinsch­aut, ruhig und aufmerksam, mit der mel­an­chol­ischen Dis­tanz dessen, der schon viel gese­hen hat. Der Foto­graf sagt: „Ich nehme lieber Tages­licht – ohne Blitz“. Das hin­wie­der­um erstaunt mich, ich hatte eher mit ein­er com­putergesteuer­ten Anlage aus hinterein­andergeschal­teten Blitzen und Reflekt­orschir­men gerech­net, mit der jede Som­mer­sprosse auf mein­er Nase poren­tief aus­geleuchtet worden wäre. Die Ruhe, mit der er den Grauver­lauf auf einem großen Papi­er­bo­gen für den Hin­ter­grund aus­richtet, die Vorhänge ein Stückchen weit­er zuzieht, dam­it das Licht den richti­gen Weg nim­mt, die Pos­i­tion der beiden Hock­er festlegt – ein­en für mich und ein­en für sich –, das Stat­iv samt Kam­era pos­i­tioniert, über­trägt sich auf mich. „Ich würde gern ein­fach mal den Fez mit dem Anzug probier­en“, sage ich. „Es gibt ein Por­trait des russ­isch-jüdis­chen Schrift­s­tellers Essad Bey, der mit siebzehn zum Islam kon­ver­tiert ist, aus den 20er Jahren, da sitzt er genau so gekleidet im Café Kran­z­ler, und es sieht irgend­wie schräg aus.“ Der Foto­grafen nickt: „Finde ich gut“, sagt er. Der Grün­ton meines Anzug bil­det mit dem dunklen Rot des Fez, dem hell­blauen Hemd und der gestreiften Krawatte, ein­en schön­en Klang. Den­noch, oder viel­leicht gerade deshalb, will er hauptsäch­lich Schwar­z­weißb­ilder machen.Draußen schieben sich Wolken vor die Sonne, mit einem Mal ist es ein­ige Stufen dunk­ler im Raum, das Licht nicht mehr scharf son­dern gestreut. Während ich erzähle, wie ich an die unter­schied­lichen Kleidungsstücke gekom­men bin, was sie für mich bedeu­ten, bei welchen Gele­gen­heiten ich sie ben­utze, ist der Foto­graf dam­it beschäftigt, das Licht an dem Platz, auf dem ich sitzen soll, den ver­änder­ten Gegeben­heiten am Him­mel anzu­passen. Jede Ver­än­der­ung der Vorhang­pos­i­tion hat Aus­wirkun­gen auf den Hin­ter­grund, auf die Schat­ten und Lini­en in meinem Gesicht. Ich lehne mich etwas vor, rücke ein Stück nach links. Alles, was er tut, wirkt selt­sam beiläufig, hat nichts von der über­span­nten Erre­gung Hek­tik, die man in einem Fotostu­dio erwar­tet.  Noch immer­scheint es, als wäre das, worüber wir reden, das Eigent­liche, und die Bilder, die gemacht wer­den sol­len, stell­ten eher ein Neben­produkt dar. Mein Blick bleibt an einem Louis XVI Ses­sel mit oran­gero­tem Samt hän­gen, der in der hinter­en Ecke steht, und den ich vor laut­er Kunst über­se­hen hatte. Mir fällt das Foto von Essad Bey im Café Kran­z­ler wieder ein: „Lass uns doch den neh­men, das wäre viel­leicht lust­ig“, sage ich und deute auf den Ses­sel. Ich sehe im Gesicht, den Augen des Foto­grafen, wie er die Vor­stel­lung von mir mit dem Fez im Anzug auf dem Ses­sel mit der Idee des Bildes in seinem Kopf ver­gleicht, sehe, wie sich Skep­sis und Ein­ver­ständ­nis abwech­seln. Schließ­lich wil­ligt er ein, und wir tauschen mein­en Hock­er gegen den Ses­sel aus. Ich sitze jet­zt etwas niedrig­er als zuvor, so dass er Vorhang, Hin­ter­grund und Stat­iv neu justier­en muss. „Warte mal ein­en Moment“, sagt er und ver­schwin­det in die Küche. Ich höre das Mahl­werk der Espressomaschine, dann das Brummen, während der Kaf­fee durch­fließt. Mit einem ander­en, offen­kun­dig eben­falls kost­bar­en Mokkatässchen in der Hand kehrt er zurück. Es hat eine hohe Bie­der­mei­er­form, weiß mit sen­krecht­en Gold­streifen und drei klein­en Löwen­füßen. „Du musst den Kaf­fee nicht trinken, aber viel­leicht kannst du die Tasse vor der Brust hal­ten“, sagt er.  In diesem Moment bin ich ganz sich­er, dass Essad Bey auf dem Foto auch eine Mokka­tasse in der Hand hält – wenn nicht das gleiche Mod­ell, dann zumind­est ein sehr ähnliches.„Wo kom­mt das her – welche Man­u­fak­tur?“ frage ich. „KPM“, sagt der Pho­to­graph. „Das passt doch per­fekt“, sage ich.„Kannst du die Tasse noch ein bis­schen nach vorn nei­gen, dass man den Kaf­fee auch sieht? Und den Kopf ein klein wenig nach rechts.“ Sein Blick auf mich, mein Blick in die Kam­era, an der Kam­era vorbei, auf ihn, während der Ver­schluss klickt – wieder und wieder und wieder.Christoph Peters, No Show. Dis­tanz Ver­lag, Ber­lin 2019.

  • Oliver Mark – Social Stills

    Carolin Hilker-Möll, No Show. Distanz Verlag, Berlin 2019, ISBN 978–3‑95476–281‑1.

    Wer sind wir und wenn ja, wie viele? Was möcht­en wir sein, was macht uns aus, wie wollen wir gese­hen wer­den? Oliv­er Mark ist ein Meister der Menschen-Foto­grafie. Seine Porträts erzäh­len Geschicht­en von Ver­frem­dung, Über­la­ger­ung, Zer­split­ter­ung, Auf­spal­tung, Dop­pe­lung, Ver­schnürung, Ver­pack­ung, Schau-Spiel – und geben dabei oft mehr pre­is als gewollt, sowohl über den Porträtier­ten als auch den Foto­grafen. Die sorgfältig inszen­ier­ten Momen­tauf­nah­men weis­en als „social stills“ über sich hinaus: Sie ana­lysier­en den Menschen, sie verorten seine Rolle in der Gesell­schaft, es sind Spiegel­b­ilder. Oliv­er Mark ist ein Menschen-Sammler: Künst­ler, Maler, Bild­hauer, Schaus­piel­er, Musiker, Philo­sophen, Politiker, Theat­er- und Film­re­gis­seure, Schrift­s­teller, Modedesign­er, Fam­i­li­enauf­s­tel­lungen… Immer fin­d­et er den beson­der­en Moment, man spürt die Ver­bindung von Foto­graf und Gegenüber. Konzentrierte Nähe wech­selt sich ab mit fast bedeu­tung­süber­laden­en Inszen­ier­ungen und gewollt beiläufi­gen Bildern. Oliv­er Mark ist ein Rah­men-Künst­ler. Durch sein ges­amtes foto­grafisches Werk zieht sich der Bilder­rah­men als Motiv, als Stilmit­tel, als Span­nungs­ge­ber, als Begren­zung und Botschaft. Sei es das kun­stvolle Still­leben der leer­en Rah­men, die mit ihren schwar­zen Flächen auf das titel­gebende „Nicht-Erschein­en“ ver­weis­en oder das Arrange­ment sein­er Arbeiten in üppig ver­gol­de­ten Barock- oder anti­ken Ovalrah­men: Die dadurch erzeugte assozi­at­ive Nähe zur Alt­meister­malerei – ver­stärkt durch das immer wieder­kehrende Motiv der Hände oder durch Van­itas-Zit­ate im Bild – ver­fehlt ihre nobil­it­i­er­ende Wirkung nicht, gerade auch wenn sie wieder iron­isch gebrochen wird. Oliv­er Mark ist ein Charak­ter-Such­er. Da, wo er fündig wird, wo er am meisten bei sich ist, am stärk­sten, am dich­t­esten, da wird ein Gesicht zum Ant­l­itz, in dem sich unsere Zeit spiegelt. Mit Wucht trifft den Betrachter die Intim­ität des Moments und man ist froh, diesen Moment teilen zu dür­fen. So bei Louise Bour­geois, die Oliv­er Mark 1996 als 85-jährige in New York foto­grafiert: Ihr Gesicht ist eine Landkarte ihres Lebens, jeder Kampf hat seine Spuren hin­ter­lassen. Die Augen fast geschlossen, der Fok­us liegt auf den Händen der großen Künst­ler­in, Aus­druck ein­er Epoche. Wir sehen ein­en „Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts“.

  • der mensch ≠ animal rationale

    Georg Maria Roers SJ, No Show. Distanz Verlag, Berlin 2019, ISBN 978–3‑95476–281‑1.

    Oliv­er Mark hat zwei Gründe genan­nt, war­um er als Foto­graf arbeitet: „Entweder fuer Bilder oder fuer ein Hon­or­ar.“ Mir scheint, hier fehlen ein­ige wesent­liche Dinge. Dazu gibt er eben­falls beden­kenswerte Hin­weise. Auf der ein­en Seite bringt es sein Beruf mit sich, Cate Blanchett in einem Moment abzu­licht­en, wo sie schein­bar völ­lig entspan­nt in einem eng­lischen Club­ses­sel mehr liegt als sitzt. Ein­fach wie hingegossen.Die Eleg­anz des Raumes hat gegen die Aura dieser Schaus­piel­er­in nicht den Hauch ein­er Chance und verblasst. Auf der ander­en Seite weiß nur der Foto­graf: er hatte nur ein­en Ver­such­bez­iehung­s­weise drei Minuten, um das Bild zu machen. Dabei ist er immer auf der Suche nach ein­er per­fek­ten Form, einem in sich ruhenden Aus­druck. Über­lässt Mark alles dem Zufall? Er sagt, dass sei eher sel­ten. „Aber wenn der Zufall dann da ist, kann es ein Feuer­werk sein.“ Das Gegen­teil dav­on ist die Art und Weise wie etwa die Maler des Golden Zeit­al­ters in den Nieder­landen zu Werke gin­gen. Zum Beis­piel bei einem Jan Ver­meer. „Er drapierte ein­en Tischläufer auf den Tisch, erset­zte ihn durch das blaue Tuch. Er legte die Per­len in ein­er Reihe obenauf, arran­gierte sie zu einem Häufchen, dann wieder zu ein­er Reihe. Er bat die Frau aufzustehen, sich hin­zu­set­zen, sich anzulehnen,  sich vorzubeu­gen.“ Tracy Che­va­lier lässt die junge Magd Griet in ihr­em Buch Das Mäd­chen mit dem Per­len­ohr­ring (1999) in das Aller­hei­lig­ste des Künst­lers eindrin­gen. Sie beo­bachtet im Atelier, wie der Maler sorgfältig Szene für Szene arran­giert. Und ein­mal wagt sie das Unge­heuer­liche. Sie bringt – nicht nur aus ästhet­ischen Gründen – etwas Unord­nung in das Arrange­ment ihres strengen Meisters. Ihr heim­lich­er Blick in die Cam­era obscura lässt den Leser über­ras­cht zurück. Klingt, was die Schrift­s­teller­in hier bes­chreibt, wirk­lich so anders als die Schil­der­ung der Vorbereit­ung eines „shoot­ings“ von Oliv­er Mark? „In der Regel habe ich die Auf­nahme vor dem Shoot­ing mit meinem Assist­en­ten ein­mal kom­plett foto­grafiert. Da wird alles aus­probiert: Wie jemand stehen kön­nte, sitzen kön­nte, Schul­ter vor, wieder zurück, Kopf nach rechts, links, stopp, zu viel … Ich mache ein­en Licht­test, probiere her­um. Diese Vorbereit­ung kann bis zu zwei Stun­den dauern. Klingt nüchtern. Ist aber essen­zi­ell! Ohne Konzept wird es schwi­erig. Um zu impro­vis­ier­en, um noch bess­er zu sein, brauche ich etwas, das ich ver­wer­fen kann.“ Ein Foto­graf muss schnell und genau sein. Er soll­te flex­i­bel sein und den Mut dazu haben Fehler zu machen. Bei aller Genauigkeit geht es um die Fähigkeit, im richti­gen Moment ein­en wirk­lich ori­ginel­len Ein­fall zu nutzen, der auch mal alles über den Haufen schmeißt. Das kann her­risch wirken oder göt­t­lich. Der Mensch sei ein „anim­al rationale“ hat schon Mar­tin Luth­er in sein­er Gen­es­is­vor­le­sung for­mu­liert. Manch­mal reißt selbst der Geduldsfaden Gottes, falls es so etwas gibt. Am Ende der Sint­flut aber woll­te Gott die Erde nicht mehr ver­fluchen, obwohl das „Dicht­en und Tracht­en des mensch­lichen Herzens böse ist von Jugend auf“ (1. Mose 8, 21a). Erst danach segnet Gott Noah und seine Söhne, auf dass sie frucht­bar sei­en und – viel­leicht soll­te man das noch hin­zufü­gen – furcht­bar: „Furcht und Schreck­en vor euch sei über allen Tier­en auf Erden und über allen Vögeln unter dem Him­mel, über allem, was auf dem Erd­boden wim­melt, und über allen Fisc­hen im Meer, in eure Hände sei­en sie gegeben“ (1. Mose 9, 2). Der Mensch unter­wirft sich die Welt, in der er lebt. Zuwei­len redet er sie sich ohne jeg­liche Empath­ie schön. Leider! Es gilt als mensch­lich, wenn auch im bib­lis­chen Sinne ver­wer­f­lich. Wie ver­halte ich mich von Berufs wegen oder privat? Die Abgründigkeit unser­er Spez­ies bleibt unbe­greif­lich. Die Skala reicht von unge­heurer Bru­tal­ität bis zu hinge­bungs­voller Zärt­lich­keit. Zuwei­len legen Menschen per­sön­liche Bek­en­nt­n­isse ab, die nicht zwin­gend reli­giös sein müssen. Manch­mal sind sie es aber aus­drück­lich wie bei dem Kath­o­liken Har­ald Schmidt auf der Orgelem­pore des Köl­ner Doms, der unter ander­em aus­ge­bil­de­ter Kirchen­musiker ist, oder dem Innen­min­is­ter außer Dienst Thomas de Maiz­ière, der als Prot­est­ant Jesuitenschüler war. Je mehr Gegensätze Oliv­er Mark ins Bild set­zen kann, um so bess­er. Die erhöhte Span­nung wird in der Bild­find­ung sicht­bar. Die Sujets wech­seln und über­schneiden sich zuwei­len auf ern­ste, oft auf komis­che Weise. Welche Hei­lige Messe im barock­en Rah­men hält eigent­lich Andreas Golder? Ist er Maler, Hoher­priester der Kunst oder beides? Es ist die Aufgabe eines Porträt­fo­to­grafen, so viel wie mög­lich von den Untiefen eines Menschen sicht­bar zu machen, ohne seine Aura zu beschädi­gen – immer wis­send, dass er ledig­lich jemand ist, der im richti­gen Moment den richti­gen Ton fin­d­et, dam­it sich das jew­ei­lige „Mod­el“ wohl füh­len kann. Die richtige Ans­prache zu find­en ist also nicht nur für den Train­er ein­er Fußball­mannschaft wichtig. Die Schat­ten vorteil­haft ins Licht zu set­zen bleibt ans­pruchs­voll. Ob das bei Isa Melsheimer ein­fach­er ist, weil sie dem Foto­grafen auch privat sehr nahe steht? Welche schöne Frau würde freiwil­lig auf einem klein­en Pod­est aus Teer­pappe in wel­chem Ber­liner Bezirk auch immer vor bewölk­tem Him­mel im schwar­zen Som­merkleid mit golden­en High Heels stehen, um Super­girl zu lesen? Auf Melsheimer fol­gt Max­imili­an Jaen­isch, hier ohne Augen­licht und mit dop­pel­ter Stirn, dann eine Madonna, so der Titel. Und ikono­graph­isch gese­hen ist es wohl tat­säch­lich die Gottes­mut­ter mit Kind. Allerd­ings ist der Hei­li­genschein hier so vort­reff­lich aus­ge­prägt, dass selbst das Baby aus dem Staunen nicht mehr herauskom­mt. Es scheint ein Goldre­gen niederzuge­hen auf das Jesus­kind. Es ist kun­stvoll eingewick­elt in schwar­zen Stoff. Sei es die Madonna und ihr Sohn oder Nor­mal­s­ter­b­liche, ein weit­er­er Grund war­um Oliv­er Mark foto­grafiert, ist: er interessiert sich ein­fach für Menschen. Er ist maßlos neu­gierig. Und er agiert ohne Anse­hen der Per­son. Er ist aufgeregt wie ein Jag­dhund, der auf Beutezug geht. Er bew­er­tet nichts, son­dern er wer­tet die Per­son auf, die er ablichtet. „no show“ wirft ein­en ander­en Blick auf Schaus­piel­er und Künst­ler­innen, auf Politiker, Musiker, auf jeden, der oder die Oliv­er Mark vor die Kam­era bekom­mt. Dieser Vor­gang hat etwas Egal­itäres. Prom­in­ente kom­men nicht in Paparazzi-Mani­er zu Fall wie der fried­lich sch­lafende Will Smith etwa und ein weni­ger bekan­nter Künst­ler wird nicht gleich durch ein ein­ziges Foto ber­üh­mt. Wir erfahren oft wenig. War­um hat der Ber­liner Künst­ler Saâdane Afif ein oder sein Zim­mer vollgequalmt? Hat eine Nebel­maschine nachge­holfen? Wir sehen ein­en nachden­k­lichen Menschen, der auf einem Schaf­s­fell sitzt. Oder sehen wir ein­en Mann in ein­er Land­schaft im Mor­gen­nebel im Hoch­moor? Was sagt das Bild über den fran­zös­is­chen Objekt- und Install­a­tion­skünst­ler aus? Oliv­er Mark löst die Rät­sel, die uns seine Bilder aufgeben, nicht auf. Er lässt die Dinge bewusst offen, um der Betrach­ter­in oder dem Betrachter Raum für eigene Assozi­ation­en zu lassen. Wer die Bilder entschlüs­seln mag, kann es ver­suchen. Ob es voll­ständig gelingt? Die Gedanken mögen da ein­set­zen, wo wir uns die Frage stel­len, wie das jew­ei­lige Bild entstanden ist? Oder? Was ist die Geschichte hinter der Geschichte jedes ein­zelnen Bildes? Mark sch­eut sich in diesem Buch nicht, dem Porträt des angesagten Philo­sophen und Kul­turkritikers Sla­voj Žižek ein­ige schwar­ze Kre­ise hin­zuzufü­gen und mit vielen klein­en Punk­ten den Him­mel zu bedeck­en. Deswe­gen gilt er nicht gleich als ein fran­zös­is­cher Poin­til­list. Aber er spren­gt deut­lich das Nor­mal­maß dessen, was gemein­hin von einem Foto­grafen ver­langt wird. Der Kom­pon­ist Dirk von Lowtzow, Sänger und Gitar­rist bei der deutschen Rock­band Toco­tron­ic, wusste ver­mut­lich nicht, dass am Ende von ihm nur ein Kon­takt­abzug der Firma Kodak übrig bleiben würde, die sel­ber mit­tler­weile bereits Geschichte ist. Mark reiht den Musiker geschickt ein in die Reihe ein­er ander­en Geschichte, näm­lich die der Rock­musiker. Dass das Ver­gan­gene immer neu erzählt wer­den muss, darüber hat schon Oscar Wilde in seinem Text Der Künst­ler nachgedacht: „Eines Abends trat in seine Seele das Ver­lan­gen, ein Bild­nis zu machen: »Die Lust des Augen­blicks«. Und er ging in die Welt, nach Bronze zu suchen. Denn er kon­nte nur in Bronze den­ken.“ Der Bild­hauer macht sich auf die Suche. Aber es war keine Bronze zu find­en außer das Porträt auf dem Grab eines Fre­undes. Es soll­te ein Sym­bol nie endender Menschen­liebe sein und ein­er Menschensorge dien­en, die eben­falls nie endet. Der kur­ze Text schließt so: „Und er nahm das Bild­nis, das er gemacht hatte, set­zte es in ein­en großen Tiegel und gab es dem Feuer.“ Jet­zt kann etwas Neues entstehen. Mark den­kt nicht in Bronze, son­dern ist äußerst wendig. Im Übri­gen gehören Bronzen mehr oder weni­ger der Ver­gan­gen­heit an. Selbst Kan­z­ler­innen oder Bunde­spräsid­en­ten sind auf Lein­wand umgestie­gen und lassen sich am Ende ihr­er Tätigkeit malen. Zu Beginn ihr­er Amt­szeit wird immer ein off­iz­i­elles Foto ange­fer­tigt. Im Fall des Staat­sober­hauptes landet es dann in allen Amtss­tuben der Repub­lik und in den aus­ländis­chen Botschaften. Diese Bilder sind meistens lang­wei­lig, weil sie bestim­mte Vor­gaben erfül­len müssen. Deshalb hat es Marks Bild von Bunde­spräsid­ent Joachim Gauck im Rosen­garten in kein off­iz­i­elles Gefilde geschafft. Das gilt auch für das Dop­pel­porträt des Schaus­piel­ers Lars Eidinger. Es ist sehr viel aufre­gender als off­iz­i­elle Theat­er­fo­tos. Wird hier nur der Schat­ten sein­er Per­son gezeigt? Links der Mensch, rechts die Maske, die Rolle, das Amt, kurz: die per­sona. Hier kom­mt die anti­ke Vor­stel­lung dieses Wor­tes zum Aus­druck. Alle Menschen haben ein­en bestim­mten Charak­ter, der nicht immer mit dem Amt, das er oder sie innehat, gleichzu­set­zen ist. Jür­gen Beck­er dichtete ein­mal: „Nachmit­tags hat mir zerkratzt / ein alter Ast die Stirn die Augen­haut / Es hat seit den Frösten nicht so geblitzt / bis in das Ver­las­sen­sein den ziehenden Abend.“ Schauen wir auf eines der Selb­st­por­traits von Oliv­er Mark, wo er sich mit der Künst­ler­in Birgit Dieker abbil­det. Der Foto­graf bleibt unter der zerkratzen Maske ver­bor­gen. Ein ungewöhn­liches Bild, das uns zeigt, der Foto­graf ist so oder so anwesend, auch wenn wir ihn nicht sehen. Wir kön­nten auch sagen, Gott ist so oder so anwesend, auch wenn wir ihn nicht sehen. Beide sind Schöp­fer schön­er Dinge. Beide schaf­fen den Menschen immer wieder neu, zei­gen ihn von sein­er besten Seite. Hier kom­mt ein Konkur­ren­zver­hält­nis zum Vorschein zwis­chen Gott und dem Künst­ler, das sich bis heute forts­chreibt. Wie tra­gisch die Geschichte ver­laufen kann, wenn ein bedeu­tender Künst­ler in einem Porträt die tat­säch­liche Schön­heit eines Menschen abbil­det, ist in Oscar Wildes ein­zi­gem Roman nachzulesen: Das Bild­nis des Dori­an Gray. Manch­mal mutet der Reigen dieser Porträts an wie der Film Die fabel­hafte Welt der Amélie (2001).Es begegnen uns bekan­nte und unbekan­nte Gestal­ten, die mit Mit­teln der Ironie (die Stiefel von Oliv­er Mark), der Ver­frem­dung (die Päp­stin), der Über­höhung (Karl-Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jac­ob Phil­ipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Buhl-Freiherr von und zu Gut­ten­berg), des Under­state­ments (Mia Far­row), der Übermalung (Mar­cel von Eden und Mat­thi­as Brandt), des Zit­ats (Otto von Habs­burg auf dem flie­genden Tep­pich) ins Bild geset­zt wer­den. Im Film trifft Amélie immer wieder auf Nino Quin­cam­poix, ein­en Sammler von wegge­wor­fen­en Bildern aus Fotoauto­maten. Als Amélie das Album fin­d­et, das er ver­loren hat, erken­nt sie in ihm ein­en Seelen­ver­wandten und ver­liebt sich in ihn. Möchte man sich in den ein­en oder die andere der Porträtier­ten ver­lieben? Etwa in Max Raabe oder Mar­ilyn Man­son, die auf einem Bild erschein­en, obwohl der Stil ihr­er Musik Wel­ten aus­ein­an­der­liegt? Oder sol­len wir die Musiker­in Rita Ora anbeten, der­en Abbild Mark zer­schneidet wie Lucio Fontana einst seine Schnittb­ilder? In welche Welt will uns der Foto­graf ent­führen? Er dringt ein in Hotels, Ateliers, auf Bühnen, in König­spaläste und polit­ische Areale, sog­ar in das Haus eines russ­is­chen Olig­archen, alle so gut gesich­ert wie die neue Zen­t­rale des deutschen Geheim­di­en­stes auf der Chausseestraße in Ber­lin. Was das Büro klei­hues + klei­hues ent­wor­fen hat, wird im Netz so darge­boten, dass sich­er niemand daraus sch­lau wird. Alles sieht irgend­wie immer gleich aus. Oliv­er Mark macht in sein­er Kunst das Gegen­teil. Bei ihm ist alles auf erfrischende Weise immer wieder neu. War­um? Weil wir Menschen eben noch viel geheim­nisvoller sind als jeder BND und jeder andere Geheim­di­enst. Das gilt ins­beson­dere für Menschen, die Kraft ihres Amtes unend­lich oft foto­grafiert wer­den. Man glaubt, man kenne sie, so das Credo der Regen­bo­gen­presse. Mark über­ras­cht uns gerne auch sub­lim, ins­beson­dere in der Folge sein­er Bilder. Frau Merkels Raute geht seinem Kreuzes-Entwurf voraus, aus dessen Mitte die Hände sich öffn­en. Dem Porträt des Künst­lers Jonath­an Meese mit Napo­leon­hut fol­gen die Hände von Papst Bene­dikt XVI. Sein Gesicht wird erst gar nicht gezeigt, weil es ohne Zweifel schon zu oft ver­öf­fent­licht wurde. Wir erkennen ihn an seinem Fisc­her­ring an der recht­en Hand, der bis heute nicht zer­stört wurde, was sonst die Regel wäre. Die Rechte erscheint erdenschwer und weist auf der Höhe der weißen Schärpe nach unten, während die Linke frei schwebend Erklärungen abgibt. Das soll­te jeder Papst können, selbst wenn die Botschaft nicht immer leichte Kost ist. Darauf weist die Linke auch hin, denn Dau­men und Zeigefinger schein­en das Pek­t­or­ale, das Brustkreuz, fast zu ber­ühren. Im näch­sten Bild gre­ift Oliv­er Mark eine Kom­pos­i­tion von Helmut New­ton auf und erweit­ert sie. Mark hat ein Gemälde von Ernie Luley Super­star aus sein­er Sammlung einge­fügt: die Päp­stin. Wir sehen eine Frau von hin­ten, die ein weißes Pille­olum trägt. Das Mod­el bleibt anonym und trägt ein­en teuren Nerz und High Heels. Es fol­gt ein Bruch. Wir sehen, wie Mas­kierte eine alte Fab­rik ober­halb vom Pren­zlauer Berg beset­zen. Im Atelier sind keine Arbeit­er mehr zu sehen, son­dern Künst­ler. Ist die Beuyssche Rech­nung Kunst = Kapit­al aufgegan­gen? Peter Wei­bel hat längst nachgew­iesen, dass sowohl die Beuyssche The­or­ie als auch die des neokon­ser­vat­iven Ökono­men Gary­Beck­er, in seinem Buch Human Capital(1964), mit der The­or­ie vom mensch­lichen Kapit­al fehl ging. Danach sei jedes Indi­vidu­um sein eigen­er Produzent. Nach Wei­bel wurde der Mensch in beiden Fäl­len zum Kapital.[1] Wenn auch das Kapit­al mehr und mehr die wichtig­sten Koordin­aten unseres polit­ischen Sys­tem zu sein schein­en, so bleiben Künst­ler­innen und Künst­ler und der­en Kunst immer auch der not­wendige Sand im Getriebe. So jeden­falls ver­stehe ich die Bilder von Mark. Eco´s Bett mit Kreuz­worträt­sel, Buch und Arbeit­stasche macht die Lit­er­at­ur stark und ruft uns Das offene Kunstwerk (1962) oder seine Ein­führung in die Semi­otik (1968) und seine Romane in Erin­ner­ung. Eco sel­ber taucht nicht auf. Das Kunstwerk über­lebt sein­en Schöp­fer. Bei den Dosen und Bech­ern, die die Zuschauer auf den Absper­rgit­tern abgelegt haben, ist es anders. Sie über­leben nicht. Sie wer­den bald abger­äumt. Noch bilden sie ein­en schön­en Kon­trast zum eleg­anten Schriftzug am Hause des Juwe­l­iers Carti­er in Par­is. Und sie geben der Lux­us­marke ein­en Touch von Under­ground. Auf den ersten Blick kön­nte hier eine Party stat­tge­fun­den haben. Der rote Tep­pich wurde schon ein­ger­ollt. Die ein­zelnen Gäste mussten gar nicht mit aufs Bild. Die Dekadenz des Abends scheint so oder so in der Luft zu lie­gen. Dam­it spielt der Foto­graf. Aber – der Empfang hat gar nicht stat­tge­fun­den. Es sind die Über­reste der Zaungäste der Tour de France 2007. Selbst wenn Oliv­er Mark uns nur banale Gegen­stände zeigt, stellt uns der Foto­graf den gan­zen Menschen vor Augen.     Dam­it unter­läuft er das Prin­zip der Porträt­fo­to­grafie, was ins­beson­dere für Künst­ler, Philo­sophen, Schaus­piel­er und Musiker aus­ge­sprochen gut funk­tioniert. Um die Begier­den der Fans zu befeuern geben sich Diven gerne den Hauch des Unnah­bar­en. Es kann auch ein Schutz­schild sein, um sich ein wenig Privat­sphäre zu bewahren. Bei Mark wird der Schlei­er dieser Unnah­barkeit selbst bei Akt­b­ildern nicht gelüftet. Das Ferne liegt Oliv­er Mark nicht sel­ten nah. Camer­on Car­penter foto­grafiert er nicht an sein­er ber­üh­mten Orgel, während er gen­i­al­isch die Tasten schlägt und seine Füße auf den Pedalen tan­zen. Mark bit­tet sein­en Per­son­al Train­er sich nackt auf das Genie in Frack und Fliege zu legen. Beide lie­gen am Boden. Auf einem weit­ern Bild liegt Car­penter sel­ber nackt auf dem Sofa. Ein Glas Milch sor­gt dafür, dass wir sein Gemächte nicht sehen. Mark erzählt gerne von den Ein­fäl­len während des Shoot­ings. In beiden Auf­nah­men sor­gt ein blaues Schaf­s­fell für ein irrwitzig manier­istisches Bild. Der Foto­graf sitzt oft zwis­chen zwei Stüh­len. Ein­er­seits kom­mt er den Aufträ­gen sein­er Kun­den nach, ander­er­seits liebt er seine künst­lerische Freiheit und bleibt ihr treu. Markus Lüpertz hat diese Span­nung ein­mal so bes­chrieben: „Die Auftragge­ber können sagen: Mach eine Kreuzi­gung, aber wie ich sie darstelle, ist meine Geschichte. Ich bin in diesem Moment nicht Gottes Erfül­lungs­ge­hil­fe. Da bin ich – bei aller Got­tgläu­bigkeit – gottlos, weil über Gott noch das Genie steht, der Künst­ler.“ Sol­che dandy­haften Sätze hatte Emil Schu­mach­er als Mit­glied des Ordens Pour le mérite für Wis­senschaften und Kün­ste nicht nötig. Sein­en Kampf als Maler des Informel führt er völ­lig souver­än mit sein­en lan­gen schwar­zen Pin­seln bis in alle Ewigkeit weit­er. Es bleiben viele Fra­gen. Es ist ein Fest für unsere Syn­apsen und Neur­o­trans­mit­ter. Stumm bleiben die Bilder für alle, die keine Sinne haben für Abgründe und schwar­zen Humor, für Schick­sal und Mensch­liches bez­iehung­s­weise All­zu­mensch­liches, für Über­mut und das Dionys­is­che, das in den Kün­sten weit­er­lebt.  War­um weint der Künst­ler Via Lewan­dowsky? Haben wir Dieter Haller­vorden jemals so ver­let­z­lich und majestät­isch zugleich gese­hen? Ver­mut­lich nicht. Mark bleibt empath­isch und hin­ter­gründig. Den deutschen Autor und Regis­seur Thomas Har­lan zeigt er uns im Roll­stuhl in sein­er Heimat im Ber­cht­es­gaden­er Land. Mia Far­row trägt ein Holzkreuz und erin­nert mehr an eine schwäbis­che Haus­frau als an eine Schaus­piel­er­in aus dem Film Mid­sum­mer Night’s Sex Com­edy von Woody Allen. Sie wirkt hier sehr nachden­k­lich und nicht so glück­lich wie bei der Pulitzer Pre­is-Ver­lei­hung 2018. Zit­iert das Bild vom Künst­ler Wolfgang Lug­mair den ber­üh­mten Sieb­druck von Andy War­hol Gold Mar­ilyn Monroe[2], die ber­üh­m­teste Ikone der amerik­an­is­chen Pop­kul­tur ein­er mel­an­chol­ischen Diva? Muss man dem armen Ralf Zier­vo­gel wirk­lich ein­en Zier­vo­gel vom Weih­nachts­baum an die Nase klem­men? Die Ant­wort von Oliv­er Mark lautet sch­licht­weg: „Ja!“

  • Nicht von dieser Welt. In rumänischen Klöstern steht die Zeit still. Der Fotograf Oliver Mark fand Zugang zu einem verwunschenen Kosmos.

    Andreas Öhler, Die Zeit.

  • Klöster der Bukowina. “Immer mit einem glücklichen Lächeln”

    Monopol | Magazin für Kunst und Leben.

    Monopol-Artikel: „Klöster der Bukowina“.
  • Bucovina – Monastery Life

    „Bucovina Monastery Life“ by Oliver Mark. Liechtensteinisches Landesmuseum, 2018.

    Liecht­en­stein­isches Landes­mu­seum, 2018

    Ed. Rain­er Vollkom­mer, Liecht­en­stein­isches Landes­mu­seum. Text: Prof. Dr. Rain­er Vollkom­mer, Dr. Con­stantin-Emil Ursu, Pr. Teodor Bradatanu. Design by Anja Stein­ig, studiof.de.

    Ger­man, Eng­lish, Romani­an
    112 pages, 3 cov­ers.
    Soft­cov­er
    21,6 × 25,6 cm
    ISBN 978–3‑9524770–3‑8

    View Pro­ject

  • 11 Fragen an… OLIVER MARK

    Spielfeld Berlin.

  • Oliver Mark – Natura Morta

    Peter Lindhorst.

  • Gemäldegalerie der Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien, 2017

    Natura Morta
    Pho­to­graph­i­en von Oliv­er Mark in Kor­res­pondenz zu Still­leben-Gemälden der Sammlung

    Natura Morta, Oliv­er Mark’s cur­rent pro­ject, is ded­ic­ated to the ques­tion of how human beings treat their envir­on­ment and the nat­ur­al world, focus­ing in par­tic­u­lar on the anim­al king­dom as well as the aes­thet­ics and beauty of death. In the sev­en­teenth and eight­eenth cen­tur­ies, the still life genre, ori­gin­ally known as natura morta – ‘dead nature’ –, became estab­lished as stil leven in Hol­land and Still­leben in Ger­many. In this trans­ition, the notion behind the genre shif­ted from the Lat­in and Itali­an mean­ing. How­ever, if one takes life as exist­ence or being, and still as inact­ive in the sense of dead, the term con­tin­ued to express a very sim­il­ar idea, even if not quite identic­al. For his present pro­ject, Oliv­er Mark has delib­er­ated chosen the ori­gin­al Lat­in term as a way of high­light­ing the con­trast between nature = life and life­less = dead. What we dis­cov­er in his pho­to­graphs did once live and, in almost every case, was killed in the prime of life by human hand. Moreover, the natura morta term strongly shifts the focus to the anim­al and plant king­doms, pla­cing human­ity in the back­ground. Even if, of course, human beings are a part of nature, we are only one small part com­pared to nature’s vast diversity.

    Oliv­er Mark’s still life pho­to­graphs were taken in a Ger­man cus­toms’ stor­age room in Bonn where the court exhib­its are kept. In his pho­tos, he orches­trates objects con­fis­cated by the cus­toms as clas­sic art still lifes – from leo­pard skulls and carved ivory to products from cro­codile, tor­toise or turtle, parts of pro­tec­ted anim­als and plants, hunt­ing trophies, snake­skin gar­ments, music­al instru­ments from valu­able trop­ic­al woods, and souven­irs such as sea horses, cor­al, snails and sea shells.

    Oliv­er Mark presents his works in his­tor­ic paint­ing frames. In the Paint­ings Gal­lery, this gen­er­ates par­al­lels between the genres of paint­ing and pho­to­graphy, but also between pho­to­graph­ic and painted still lifes. Togeth­er with Oliv­er Mark’s pho­to­graphy, the Paint­ings Gal­lery is show­ing nine works from its own col­lec­tion by artists such as Willem van Aelst, Philips Angel van Mid­del­burg, Abra­ham van Beyer­en, Jan van der Hey­den, Max­imili­an Pfeiler, Abra­ham Susenir, Jan Weenix, and the suc­cessors of Peter Paul Rubens, cre­at­ing new per­spect­ives on mas­ter­pieces of sev­en­teenth-cen­tury Dutch art.

    In this way, vis­it­ors can explore a wide range of asso­ci­at­ive ideas. Ideally, these pro­duce new and dif­fer­ent views of seem­ingly ‘well-known’ paint­ings in the col­lec­tion, or encour­age the aes­thet­ic enjoy­ment of the pho­to­graphs and lead to reflec­tions on how human­ity treats the nat­ur­al world.

    In the Nat­ur­al His­tory Museum, where a fur­ther three groups of Oliv­er Mark’s pho­to­graph­ic works are shown jux­ta­posed with anim­al spe­ci­mens, the focus is on the pro­tec­tion of endangered spe­cies. The trade in anim­al and plant spe­cies is reg­u­lated under inter­na­tion­al law, ban­ning many souven­irs from being impor­ted into the sig­nat­ory coun­tries. The author­it­ies enforce this law under the Con­ven­tion on Inter­na­tion­al Trade in Endangered Spe­cies of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which pro­tects over 35,000 threatened anim­als and plants and was rat­i­fied by Aus­tria in 1982.

    Oliv­er Mark’s impress­ive pho­to­graphs offer space for ideas and asso­ci­ations across a broad spec­trum of top­ics: How do people treat their envir­on­ment? What so fas­cin­ates us about the still life genre? And what dis­tin­guishes paint­ing from photography?

    Julia M. Nauhaus, Dir­ect­or of the Pic­ture Gal­lery Academy of Fine Arts Vienna
  • Die Rückkehr der Moral

    Brigitte Borchhardt-Birbaumer, Wiener Zeitung.

  • Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, 2017

    Natura Morta
    Pho­to­graph­i­en von Oliv­er Mark in Kor­res­pondenz zu Still­leben aus der Sammlung der Gemälde­galer­ie und Tier­prä­par­aten des Naturhis­tor­ischen Museums

  • ºCLAIRbyKahn Gallery, Munich 2017

    Between Skies and Earth
    Alv­in Lang­don Coburn & Oliv­er Mark

    The light and the obscure, the sky and the earth, the eth­er­e­al and the cor­por­eal. Such jux­ta­pos­i­tions have long formed the essence of the photographer’s art and a mas­tery of these ele­ments can evoke entire uni­verses of nuance and emotion.

    Oliv­er Mark (b. Ger­many, 1963) is one of the mod­ern geni­uses in the use of these ele­ments; and Alv­in Lang­don Coburn (b. Amer­ica, 1882; d. Wales, 1966) pos­sessed such a gift in their use that his work forms the found­a­tion of pictori­al­ist pho­to­graphy. CLAIR Gal­lery cur­ated an exhib­i­tion, Between Skies and Earth, that explored the overt and cov­ert con­nec­tions between these two cel­eb­rated pho­to­graph­ers who are sep­ar­ated by more than a century.

    CLAIR Gal­lery presen­ted Between Skies and Earth from March 30, 2017 to June 11, 2017 at Franz-Joseph-Strasse 10 in Munich.

    Oliv­er Mark is renowned for his por­traits of aris­to­crats, artists, and celebrit­ies. His work has been pub­lished in magazines such as Vogue and Van­ity Fair, while his pho­to­graphs have been exhib­ited in museums around the world. More inform­a­tion avail­able at his artist page or  on his per­son­al website.Alvin Lang­don Coburn was a pion­eer­ing fig­ure in pho­to­graphy and an early mas­ter of pictor­al­ism. He began tak­ing pho­to­graphs as a young child and his career spanned more than six dec­ades. His work bears wit­ness to the rise of the great mod­ern cit­ies and he was fas­cin­ated by the dynam­ic com­plex­ity of these new urb­an envir­on­ments. Coburn had a par­tic­u­lar geni­us for pho­to­graph­ing move­ment, wheth­er it be the eer­ie play of arti­fi­cial and nat­ur­al light at night­fall in New York City or the traces of ped­es­tri­ans seen from a perch high above a Lon­don park. To see more of his work, vis­it his CLAIR artist page.

    Anna-Patri­cia Kahn, 2017
  • Natura Morta

    „Natura Morta“ by Oliver Mark. Kehrer, Heidelberg 2016.

    Kehr­er Ver­lag, 2016

    Ed. Rain­er Vollkom­mer, Liecht­en­stein­isches Landes­mu­seum. Text: Lorenz Beck­er, Phil­ipp Demandt, Aure­lia Frick, Bar­bara Hendricks, Chris­ti­an Köberl, Julia M. Nauhaus, Michael Schip­per, Rain­er Vollkommer.

    Ger­man, Eng­lish
    136 pages, 57 ills.
    Hard­cov­er
    30,4 x 37,5 cm
    ISBN 978–3‑86828–759‑2

    View Pro­ject · Down­load

  • Ausstellung „Berlin is for Lovers“ in Berlin-Tiergarten: (Halb)nackte Berliner auf Polaroids

    Philipp Fritz, Berliner Zeitung.

  • Lindenau-Museum Altenburg, 2015–2016

    In Szene geset­zt: Aus Porträts wer­den Kleider
    10.10.2015–03.04.2016

    A col­lec­tion of Oliv­er Mark’s pho­to­graphs were shown as part of a major por­trait exhib­i­tion at the Lindenau-Museum in Alten­burg, Ger­many. from Octo­ber 10, 2015 to April 3, 2016 Mark’s pho­to­graphs were fea­tured along with paint­ings by such artists as Domen­ico Ghir­landaio (15th cen­tury) and Michiel van Mierev­elt (17th century).

  • Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz, 2014

    Aus den Trüm­mern kriecht das Leben
    Por­traits von Karl Otto Götz
    23.02.2014—25.05.2014

    Im Jahr 2013 hatte der Foto­graf Oliv­er Mark (*1963) die Gele­gen­heit, den Künst­ler K.O. Götz (*1914) mehr­ere Tage in seinem privaten Lebensum­feld zu besuchen. Es entstanden eindring­liche und intime Foto­grafi­en, die K.O. Götz ungeschminkt und sehr facetten­reich zei­gen – stolz und nachden­k­lich, aber auch zer­brech­lich und zart, gezeich­net von einem 100-jährigen schaf­fens­reichen Künst­ler­leben. Beg­leitet wer­den die 18 aus­ges­tell­ten Bilder von sieben ber­ührenden Gedi­cht­en, die K.O. Götz über mehr­ere Jahre schrieb. Alle Foto­grafi­en und Gedi­chte pub­liz­ierte Oliv­er Mark in dem Künst­ler­buch „Aus den Trüm­mern kriecht das Leben“ (2013). Wir danken Rissa und der K.O. Götz und Rissa-Stif­tung herz­lich für die Ermög­lichung dieser Ausstellung.